In this sonnet, the poet is giving almost fatherly advice to the fair youth. It follows the typical rhyme scheme of the English sonnet, ABAB CDCD EFEF GG. I do forgive thy robbery, gentle thief, Although thou steal thee all my poverty: And yet, love knows it is a greater grief. Page All rights reserved. . Sonnet 41 42. No love, my love, that thou mayst true love call. 5 Then if for my love thou my love receivest, I cannot blame thee, for my love thou usest. In the first lines of ‘Sonnet 40,’ the speaker begins by telling the Fair Youth to take all his loves. Sonnet 40 begins a three-sonnet sequence in which the poet shares his possessions and his mistress with the youth, although it is not until Sonnet 41 that he directly mentions their liaison. Analysis of Sonnet 40 Lines 1-4 . Posted in Sonnet Analysis | Tagged conqueror, dark lady, fair text, foul copy, Friar Laurence, hope, marginal notes, military imagery, Romeo, Shakespeare's Sonnet 138, Sonnet 40, Sonnet 66, teacher and student | Leave a reply Astrophil and Stella, Sonnet 35 Loving offenders thus I will excuse ye: ... See 36, 39, 40. In this poem I believe that "love" has many different meanings written into it ,harsh, soft, and weakness. How much one enjoys this stuff depends greatly on how much one appreciates frequent punning in a supposedly sincere love poem, we suppose. By wilful taste of what thyself refusest. © 2020 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. It is noticeable that this sonnet uses the word 'love' considerably more than in any other sonnet (10 times, as love, love's or loves). ‘if in exchange for my love for you you received my lover’. The speaker goes through the first twelve lines of this poem debating what is going to happen to the love in his life. Of all Shakespeare’s Sonnets, Sonnet 40 is perhaps the most relentlessly focused on ‘love’: the word itself recurs ten times in the sonnet’s fourteen lines, including twice in the poem’s opening line: ‘Take all my loves, my love, yea take them all’. . Sonnet 34: Why didst thou promise such a beauteous day By William Shakespeare About this Poet While William Shakespeare’s reputation is based primarily on his plays, he became famous first as a poet. So, to a paraphrase of the sonnet’s meaning: ‘Take everyone I love – no, go on, really, take them. Then if, in exchange for my love, you received the affections of my mistress, I can’t say I blame you, for you used my lover; however, if you’ve tricked yourself into thinking that by sleeping with my mistress you are tasting what you are refusing to enjoy. By wilful taste of what thyself refusest. A summary and paraphrase of Shakespeare’s 40th sonnet. Sonnet 42 43. Even when doing wrong you somehow make evil look good, so kill me with your bad behaviour, I don’t mind – we must not become enemies.’. Sonnet 40 Analysis. William Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 73,” Ben Jonson’s “On My First Son,” and E. E. Cumming’s “in Just- spring,” are sentimental poems which independently and effectually express the loss of time, loss of a child, and loss of innocence. The use of the word "love" may be confusing to readers, for "love" in this sonnet means at least three different things. In short, Sonnet 40 is a rather long-drawn-out (some would say laboured) play on the double meaning of the phrase ‘my love’. The final couplet is the conclusion to what has gone before. What hast thou then more than thou hadst before? Of all Shakespeare’s Sonnets, Sonnet 40 is perhaps the most relentlessly focused on ‘love’: the word itself recurs ten times in the sonnet’s fourteen lines, including twice in the poem’s opening line: ‘Take all my loves, my love, yea take them all’. False hope which feeds but to destroy and spillWhat it first breeds unnaturall to the birthOf thine owne wombe conceiuing but to kill. ‘my love for you’); and 3) ‘my love’ as in my lover (who is not you). This may be an expression of the fact that the poet feels his love more threatened than at any other time, and by repetition of the word he will cast a spell by it and prevent it from flying away. By wilful taste of what thyself refusest. Post was not sent - check your email addresses! All mine was thine before thou hadst this more. Then, if for my love, thou my love receivest, I cannot blame thee, for my love thou usest; But yet be blam'd, if thou thy self deceivest. Forgiveness of betrayal is the theme. In the following analysis, we’re going to examine how Shakespeare’s relationship with the Fair Youth has changed by the 40th sonnet in the sequence. All mine was thine before thou hadst this more. 40 poem by Mary Wroth. The next four lines, the quatrain, deal with more fundamental issues like sex and sexuality. Interesting Literature is a participant in the Amazon EU Associates Programme, an affiliate advertising programme designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to Amazon.co.uk. Then, if for my love, thou my love receivest, Sonnet XLII. Beyond his verbal gift, the force that energises 40 Sonnets lies in his varied approach to the sonnet form. To bear love's wrong, than hate's known injury. But first, a brief summary of the poem’s background: it would appear that Shakespeare has a mistress, and that the Fair Youth has gone to bed with her. Summary and Analysis; Sonnet 1; Sonnet 18; Sonnet 60; Sonnet 73; Sonnet 94; Sonnet 97; Sonnet 116; Sonnet 129; Sonnet 130; Sonnet 146; Main Ideas. Removing #book# In Sonnet 40, Shakespeare conveys the same message as in some of his other sonnets, love. Is it too much to say there’s a faint penile pun in ‘wilful’ – i.e. Themes; Motifs; Symbols; Quotes. No love that can be called true, that’s for sure. What hast thou then more than thou hadst before? SONNET 40 PARAPHRASE; Take all my loves, my love, yea, take them all; What hast thou then more than thou hadst before? The use of the word "love" may be confusing to readers, for "love" in this sonnet means at least three different things. This video will take you through one of Shakespeare’s sonnets with text and visual annotations. Analysis of William Shakespeare's Sonnet 20 Line by Line. I forgive you for stealing from me the little I possess (i.e. But by going with them, what do you have that you didn’t already have? In the first quatrain, the first line rhymes with the third line and the second line rhymes with the fourth line. Lascivious grace, in whom all ill well shows, Kill me with spites yet we must not be foes. That (we hope) makes the poem’s meaning a little clearer, though the following lines remain something of a challenge for the literary critic: But yet be blam’d, if thou thy self deceivest 14. ... Sonnet 40. Translation. Here, "my loves" refers to the poet's possessions, both physical — the sonnets themselves — and emotional.

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